Education Drivers

Facilities

Data Mining

TITLE
SYNOPSIS
CITATION
Is the Average Enrollment of Schools Rising or Falling?
This analysis examined the average enrollment and percentage distribution of public elementary and secondary schools, by type and size in the selected years 1982-83 through 2005-06.
States, J. (2011). Is the Average Enrollment of Schools Rising or Falling? Retrieved from is-average-enrollment-of.
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SYNOPSIS
CITATION
The Impact of School Buildings on Student Health and Performance: A Call for Research

This paper examines existing research on the impact of school facilities on student health and performance. It also identifies areas for further research.

 

For-Profit Colleges

This article look at the students who attend for-profits, the reason they choose these schools, and student out-comes on the number of broad measures and draw several conclusions. The authors write, the evidences shows that public community colleges may provide an equal or better education at lower cost at any for-profits. But budget pressure mean that community colleges and other nonselective public institutions may not be able to meet the demand for higher education. Second, for-profits appear to be at their best with well-defined programs of short duration that prepare students for a specific occupation. But for-profit completion rates, default rates, and labor market outcomes for students seeking associate's or higher degrees compare unfavorable with those of public postsecondary institutions. 

Deming, D., Goldin, C., & Katz, L. (2013). For-profit colleges. The Future of Children, 137-163.
Report: California and the nation don’t spend enough on school facilities

This article discuss about the history of California spending on school facilities and the impact of the situation. 

Frey, S. (2016). Report: California and the nation don’t spend enough on school facilities. Edsource. Retrieved from https://edsource.org/2016/report-california-and-the-nation-dont-spend-enough-on-school-facilities/562142 

Why Money Matters for Improving Education

This article explore the relationship between per pupil spending and learning, particularly in developing countries that spend much lower levels in education than do OECD countries. Their findings suggest that, when education systems spend above $8,000, the association between student learning and per student spending is no longer statistically significant. Therefore, they find a threshold effect after this level of resources is met, indicating a declining relationship between resources and achievement at high levels of expenditure (consistent with other recent literature). There is a positive relationship between student learning and per pupil expenditure among the low-spending countries (below $8,000 per student), but a flat relationship among high-spending countries. 

 Vegas, E. (2016).Why Money Matters for Improving Education. Brooking Institutions. Retrieved from https://www.brookings.edu/blog/up-front/2016/07/21/why-money-matters-for-improving-education/

Research on the Impact of School Facilities on Students and Teachers: A Summary of Studies Published Since 2000

This paper examines nineteen different studies on the impact of school facility condition and design on student and teacher performance.

http://www.21csf.org/best-home/docuploads/pub/210_lit-review-lettersize-final.pdf

Category: 191, 1253
189, 1251

21st Century School Fund. (2010, February). Research on the Impact of School Facilities on Students and Teachers: A Summary of Studies Published Since 2000. Retrieved from http://www.21csf.org/best-home/docuploads/pub/210_lit-review-lettersize-final.pdf

Do School Facilities Affect Academic Outcomes?

This paper examines best available research on the impact that various aspects of school facilities have on student academic outcomes, including: indoor air quality, ventilation, and thermal comfort; lighting; acoustics; building age and quality; school size; and class size.
The research is examined here in six categories: indoor air quality, ventilation, and thermal comfort; lighting; acoustics; building age and quality; school size; and class size.

Schneider, M. (2002, November). Do School Facilities Affect Academic Outcomes? Retrieved from http://www.ncef.org/pubs/outcomes.pdf

Distraction, privacy, and classroom design

Environmental features of elementary school classrooms are examined in relation to distraction and privacy. Teachers' adjustments of their activities to make their settings less distracting are also explored. 

Ahrentzen, S., & Evans, G. W. (1984). Distraction, privacy, and classroom design. Environment and Behavior16(4), 437-454.

Comparing Closed For-Profit Colleges to Public College Sector

This research compare for-profit college networks with the public sector. The author emphasize economic criteria for evaluating colleges and the need to consider many such criteria to make a valid comparison. In conclusion, public colleges are much cheaper than for-profit colleges. From a student perspective, this difference would have to be offset by a much superior performance of for-profit colleges to be advantageous. However, the evidence tends to point in the opposite direction. While ITT’s post-enrollment student earnings are comparable to those of many public colleges, on the whole the outcomes of public colleges appear to be better than those of the two closed for-profit networks of colleges.

Belfield, C. (2016). Comparing Closed For-Profit Colleges to Public College Sector. CAPSEE. Retrieved from https://capseecenter.org/comparing-closed-for-profit-colleges-to-public-college-sector/

School Facility Conditions and Student Academic Achievement

This paper shows that the condition of school facilities has an important impact on student performance and teacher effectiveness.

 

Earthman, Glen I.(2002). School Facility Conditions and Student Academic Achievement. UCLA's Institute for Democracy, Education, & Access. UCLA: UCLA's Institute for Democracy, Education, and Access. Retrieved from: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/5sw56439

Do School Facilities Really Impact a Child's Education? Issue Trak: A CEFPI Brief on Educational Facility Issues.

This paper reviews research that correlates student achievement and the condition and utility of school facilities. The discussion focuses on the influence of various facility conditions on students, including building age, temperature and ventilation, acoustics, lighting, curriculum development, and school size. Students who attend better buildings have test scores ranging from 5 to 17 percentile points higher than students in substandard facilities.

Lyons, J. B. (2001). Do School Facilities Really Impact a Child's Education? IssueTrak: A CEFPI Brief on Educational Facility Issues. Retrieved from ERIC database.   (ED458791)

 

Future Ready Schools: Building Technology Infrastructure for Learning

The Future Ready Schools: Building Technology Infrastructure for Learning guide provides practical, actionable information intended to help district leaders (superintendents, principals, and teacher leaders) navigate the many decisions required to deliver cutting-edge connectivity to students. It presents a variety of options for district leaders to consider when making technology infrastructure decisions, recognizing that circumstances and context vary greatly from district to district.

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology, Future Ready Schools: Building Technology Infrastructure for Learning, Washington, D.C., 2014. 

U.S. Education in 2017 in 10 Charts

This article provide charts, graphs, maps, and visualizations of all feature data that Education Week released in 2017 and convey some big takeaways about U.S. schools, students, and teachers in 2017.

 

U.S. Education in 2017 in 10 Charts. Education Week, December. (2017). Retrieved from https://www.edweek.org/ew/section/multimedia/us-education-in-2017-in-10-charts.html

The walls speak: the interplay of quality facilities, school climate, and student achievement.

This study reinforces the link between the quality of school facilities and student achievement in English and mathematics, and three school climate variables.

 

Uline, C., & Tschannen‐Moran, M. (2008). The walls speak: The interplay of quality facilities, school climate, and student achievement. Journal of Educational Administration, 46(1), 55–73. doi:10.1108/09578230810849817

How does the rich-poor learning gap vary across countries?

This article show different approach that researcher took to answer questions on social gradient in education between the countries. Comparing some of these results highlights weak service delivery in many developing countries. Even where resources may be similar, social gradients are steep in some, indicating much worse educational outcomes for the poor. And public resources are often extremely poorly converted into learning. The differential ability of schools and school systems to convert resources into learning outcomes remains a major impediment to improving educational outcomes, and indeed life chances, for the poor.

Van Der Berg, S. (2015). How does the rich-poor learning gap vary across countries?. Brookings Institution. Retrieved from https://www.brookings.edu/blog/future-development/2015/03/09/how-does-the-rich-poor-learning-gap-vary-across-countries/

Functional curriculum for elementary, middle, and secondary age students with special needs

The chapters in this book deal with areas of expertise that most students will need. For example, self-determination skills, functional academics, transportation, home and community living, as well as work preparation and socialization.

Wehman, P., & Kregel, J. (2004). Functional curriculum for elementary, middle, and secondary age students with special needs. PRO-ED, Inc. 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd, Austin, TX 78757.

MAKING SENSE OF LEADING SCHOOLS A Study of the School Principalship
The purpose of this paper is to identify common roles played by principals, how these roles differ across types of schools, and finally, how effectively are preparation programs training principals in these roles.
Portin, B., Schneider, P., DeArmond, M., & Gundlach, L. (2003). Making sense of leading schools. A National Study of the Principalship. Center of Reinventing Public Education. Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs. University of Washington. Seattle, WA.

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