Education Drivers

Evidence-Based Decision Making Overview

Educators make many decisions in the course of day (e.g., which curriculum to adopt, how to support struggling readers, what to do about students with behavioral challenges). In recent years, the evidence-based practice (EBP) movement in education has raised questions about the basis for those decisions. A framework for making decisions, EBP has been defined as the integration of best available evidence, professional judgment, and stakeholder values, and context. Defining EBP as a decision-making framework implies that evidence can be used to inform all decisions that educators must make. The concept of best available evidence suggests that evidence falls along a continuum from very strong evidence at one end to very weak evidence at the other end. Including professional judgment in the definition recognizes that judgments about services are inevitable. The constraint on judgment is that it must be informed by evidence. Stakeholder values influence the goals of intervention and the acceptability of intervention methods. Consideration of context recognizes that some interventions are a better fit than others.

Publications

TITLE
SYNOPSIS
CITATION
Evidence-Based Practice in the Broader Context: How Can We Really Use Evidence to Inform Decisions?

This paper provides an overview of the considerations when introducing evidence-based services into established mental health systems.

Chorpita, B. F., & Starace, N. K. (2010). Evidence-Based Practice in the Broader Context: How Can We Really Use Evidence to Inform Decisions? Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools, 11(1), 4-29.

Evidence-Based, Empirically Supported, OR Best Practice?

Evidence-based, empirically-supported, and best practice are often used interchangeably. A case is made that for clarity each term should have a separate and distinct meaning.

Detrich, R. (2008). Evidence-Based, Empirically Supported, OR Best Practice?. Effective practices for children with autism, 1.

Treatment Integrity: Fundamental to Education Reform

To produce better outcomes for students two things are necessary: (1) effective, scientifically supported interventions (2) those interventions implemented with high integrity.  Typically, much greater attention has been given to identifying effective practices.  This review focuses on features of high quality implementation.

Detrich, R. (2014). Treatment integrity: Fundamental to education reform. Journal of Cognitive Education and Psychology, 13(2), 258-271.

 

Presentations

TITLE
SYNOPSIS
CITATION
Evolution of the Revolution: How Can Evidence-based Practice Work in the Real World?
This paper provides an overview of the considerations when introducing evidence-based services into established mental health systems.
Chorpita, B. (2008). Evolution of the Revolution: How Can Evidence-based Practice Work in the Real World? [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2008-wing-presentation-bruce-chorpita.
Research Based Dissemination: Or Confessions of a Poor Disseminator"
This paper shares research on what makes ideas "stick" (gain acceptance, maintain) within a culture and provided an acronym from the results: SUCCESS (simple, unexpected, concrete, credible, emotional, involve stories).
Cook, B. (2014). Research Based Dissemination: Or Confessions of a Poor Disseminator" [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2014-wing-presentation-bryan-cook.
If We Want More Evidence-based Practice, We Need More Practice-based Evidence
This paper discusses the importance, strengths, and weaknesses of using practice-based evidence in conjunction with evidence-based practice.
Cook, B. (2015). If We Want More Evidence-based Practice, We Need More Practice-based Evidence [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2015-wing-presentation-bryan-cook.
From Evidence-based Practice to Practice-based Evidence: Behavior Analysis in Special Education
Evidence-based practice is a decision making framework. This talk reviews the types of evidence that can be used in decision-making and when each source of evidence is best used.
Detrich, R. (2006). From Evidence-based Practice to Practice-based Evidence: Behavior Analysis in Special Education [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2006-calstatefresnoaba-presentation-ronnie-detrich.
Evidence, Ethics, and the Law
This paper reviews the legal and ethical basis for relying on scientifically supported interventions to improve outcomes for students.
Detrich, R. (2007). Evidence, Ethics, and the Law [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2007-apbs-presentation-ronnie-detrich.
Evidence-based Education: It Isn't as Simple as You Might Think
On the face of it, the mandate to utilize scientifically supported interventions to improve outcomes seems obvious and straighforward. The paper reviews the challenges involved in doing so.
Detrich, R. (2007). Evidence-based Education: It Isn't as Simple as You Might Think [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2007-calaba-ebe-presentation-ronnie-detrich.
An Expanded Model of Evidence-based Practice in Special Education
This paper reviews the types of evidence that can used to guide decision-making in special education as well as the necessity for high quality implementation, and monitoring the effects of intervention.
Detrich, R. (2006). An Expanded Model of Evidence-based Practice in Special Education [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2006-campbell-presentation-ronnie-detrich.
Single Subject Research and Evidence-based Interventions: Are SSDs Really the Ugly Stepchild?
In most discussions about high quality research, single participant designs have been relegated to a lower status. This paper reviews the characteristics of SSDs and the contributions they can make to the evidence-base.
Detrich, R. (2007). Single Subject Research and Evidence-based Interventions: Are SSDs Really the Ugly Stepchild? [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2007-aba-presentation-ronnie-detrich.
Evidence-based Education: Can We Get There From Here?
This paper reviews the steps that will be necessary to make evidence-based education a reality.
Detrich, R. (2008). Evidence-based Education: Can We Get There From Here? [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2007-calaba-ebe-presentation-ronnie-detrich.
IDEIA and Evidence-based Interventions: Implications for Practitioners
The reauthorization of special education law (IDEIA) emphasizes using scientifically supported programs. This talk reviews the implications for special education practitioners.
Detrich, R. (2008). IDEIA and Evidence-based Interventions: Implications for Practitioners [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2008-apbs-txint-presentation-ronnie-detrich.
The Ethical and Legal Basis for Evidence-based Education: Implications for the Profession
No Child Left Behind emphasized the importantance of utilizing practices that are scientifically supported. This paper reviews the implications of evidence-based education for the profession.
Detrich, R. (2008). The Ethical and Legal Basis for Evidence-based Education: Implications for the Profession [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2008-teacher-presentation-ronnie-detrich.
Best Practices: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants?
One source of evidence about effective practices is best practice guides. This talks review the advantages and limitations of these guides.
Detrich, R. (2009). Best Practices: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants? [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2009-aba-presentation-ronnie-detrich.
The Four Assumptions of the Apocalypse
This paper examines the four basic assumptions for effective data-based decision making in education and offers strategies for addressing problem areas.
Detrich, R. (2009). The Four Assumptions of the Apocalypse [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2009-wing-presentation-ronnie-detrich.
Data-based Decision Making Cultures: Four Assumptions.
Data-based decision making is often found in ethichal guidelines for practice. This paper explores four assumptions that have to be true if students are to benefit.
Detrich, R. (2010). Data-based Decision Making Cultures: Four Assumptions. [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2010-apbs-presentation-ronnie-detrich.
Evidence-based Practice: More than a List
Evidence-based practice has at least two meanings. This paper argues that it is best thought of as a decision-making framework.
Detrich, R. (2011). Evidence-based Practice: More than a List [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2011-apbs-presentation-ronnie-detrich.
Evidence-based Practice for Applied Behavior Analysts: Necessary or Redundant
Evidence-based practice has been described as a decision making framework. This presentation describes the features and challenges of this perspecive.
Detrich, R. (2015). Evidence-based Practice for Applied Behavior Analysts: Necessary or Redundant [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2013-aba-presentation-ronnie-detrich-tim-slocum-teri-lewis-trina.
Data-based Decision Making: More than the Data
Data-based decision making requires more than having data. This paper reviews what is necessary to effectively employ data-based decision making.
Detrich, R. (?). Data-based Decision Making: More than the Data [Powerpoint Slides]. Retrieved from 2009-calaba-presentation-ronnie-detrich.
TITLE
SYNOPSIS
CITATION
Destination: Equity

This special issue of Strategies is devoted to highlighting this knowledge base and corresponding practices. In this issue you will find an in-depth case study of a school district engaged in systemic improvement, using the principles and practices of what Dr. Jackson calls the Pedagogy of Confidence®. 

Destination: Equity. (2015). Strategies, 17(1) . Retrieved from https://www.aasa.org/uploadedFiles/Resources/Other_Resources/STRATEGIES-SEPT-15-FINAL.pdf

Statistics as Principled Argument

The focus of the book is that the purpose of statistics is to organize a useful argument from quantitative evidence, using a form of principled rhetoric. Five criteria, described by the acronym MAGIC (magnitude, articulation, generality, interestingness, and credibility) are proposed as crucial features of a persuasive, principled argument.

Abelson, R. P. (2012). Statistics as principled argument. Psychology Press.

Outcome evaluation of Washington State's research-based programs for juvenile offenders.

The CJAA funded the nation’s first statewide experiment concerning research-based programs for juvenile justice. The question here was whether they work when applied statewide in a “real world” setting. This report indicates that the answer to this question is yes— when the programs are competently delivered. 

Barnoski, R., & Aos, S. (2004). Outcome evaluation of Washington State’s research-based programs for juvenile offenders. Olympia, WA: Washington State Institute for Public Policy, 460.

A multilevel study of leadership, empowerment, and performance in teams

A multilevel model of leadership, empowerment, and performance was tested using a sample of 62 teams, 445 individual members, 62 team leaders, and 31 external managers from 31 stores of a Fortune 500 company. Leader-member exchange and leadership climate related differently to individual and team empowerment and interacted to influence individual empowerment. Also, several relationships were supported in more but not in less interdependent teams. Specifically, leader-member exchange related to individual performance partially through individual empowerment; leadership climate related to team performance partially through team empowerment; team empowerment moderated the relationship between individual empowerment and performance; and individual performance was positively related to team performance. Contributions to team leadership theory, research, and practices are discussed.

Chen, G., Kirkman, B. L., Kanfer, R., Allen, D., & Rosen, B. (2007). A multilevel study of leadership, empowerment, and performance in teams. Journal of Applied Psychology92(2), 331–346.

 

The Frontier of Evidence-Based Practice

These guidelines emphasized the dimensions of 1) efficacy and 2) effectiveness. A model is provided that proposes how evidence--however defined--will ultimately connect with practice. 

Chorpita, B. F. (2003). The frontier of evidence-based practice.

Do Published Studies Yield larger Effect Sizes than Unpublished Studies in Education and Special Education? A Meta-Review

The purpose of this study is to estimate the extent to which publication bias is present in education and special education journals. This paper shows that published studies were associated with significantly larger effect sizes than unpublished studies (d=0.64). The authors suggest that meta-analyses report effect sizes of published and unpublished separately in order to address issues of publication bias.

Chow, J. C., & Ekholm, E. (2018). Do Published Studies Yield Larger Effect Sizes than Unpublished Studies in Education and Special Education? A Meta-review.

Discussion Sections in Reports of Controlled Trials Published in General Medical Journals: Islands in Search of Continents?

This Section of reports aim to assess the extent to which reports of RTCs published in 5 general medical journal have discussed new results in light of all of available evidence.

Clarke, M., & Chalmers, I. (1998). Discussion sections in reports of controlled trials published in general medical journals: islands in search of continents?. Jama280(3), 280-282.

Combining evidence-based practice with stakeholder consensus to enhance pychosocial rehabilitation services in the Texas benefit design initiative.

This article describes the use of evidence-based practice along with a multi-stakeholder 
consensus process to design the psychosocial rehabilitation components in a benefit 
package of publicly funded mental health services in Texas.

 

Cook, J. A., Toprac, M., & Shore, S. E. (2004). Combining evidence-based practice with stakeholder consensus to enhance psychosocial rehabilitation services in the Texas benefit design initiative. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal27(4), 307.

Evidence-based medicine

This journal attempts to fill the chasm by helping doctors find the information that will ensure they can provide optimum management for their patients. 

Davidoff, F., Haynes, B., Sackett, D., & Smith, R. (1995). Evidence based medicine.

Getting beneath the veil of effective schools: Evidence from New York City

This paper examines data on 39 charter schools and correlates these data with school effectiveness. We find that class size, per-pupil expenditure, teacher certification, and teacher training—are not correlated with school effectiveness. In stark contrast, we show that frequent teacher feedback, the use of data to guide instruction, high-dosage tutoring, increased instructional time, and high expectations—explains approximately 45 percent of the variation in school effectiveness.

Dobbie, W., & Fryer Jr, R. G. (2013). Getting beneath the veil of effective schools: Evidence from New York City. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 5(4), 28-60.

Fundamental Principles of Evidence-based Medicine Applied to Mental Health Care

The purpose of evidence-based medicine (EBM) is to enable patients-- through the process of collaboration with their health care providers--to take advantage of the best available scientific evidence when they are making health care decisions.

Drake, R. E., Rosenberg, S. D., Teague, G. B., Bartels, S. J., & Torrey, W. C. (2003). Fundamental principles of evidence-based medicine applied to mental health care. Psychiatric Clinics of North America.

What is Evidence?

This article focuses on the most fundamental question regarding evidence-based practice: What is evidence? To address this question, the authors first review several of the definitions, criteria, and strategies that have been used to define scientific evidence. 

Drake, R.E., Latimer, E.S., Leff, H. S., McHugi, G. J., Burns, B. J. (2004). What is Evidence?. In Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, Vol. 13, pp. 717-728

Moving Teacher Preparation into the Future

This report discuss how to use research findings as a base to support stronger teacher preparation programs. 

Dynarski, M. (2014). Moving Teacher Preparation into the Future. Brookings Institute. Retrieved from https://www.brookings.edu/research/moving-teacher-preparation-into-the-future/

Why federal spending on disadvantaged students (Title I) doesn’t work

The largest Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) expenditure by far is for its Title I program. This report try to follow the money to see whether Title I funds are spent effectively and whether or not ESEA achieves its objectives. This report suggest focusing effective interventions on the neediest students may provide a way forward that is consistent with fiscal realities.

 

Dynarski, M., kainz, K. (2015). Why federal spending on disadvantaged students (Title I) doesn’t work. Brookings Institutions. Retrieved from https://www.brookings.edu/research/why-federal-spending-on-disadvantaged-students-title-i-doesnt-work/

 

Randomized controlled trials in evidence-based mental health care: Getting the right answer to the right question

The purpose of clinical research is to answer this question: Would a new treatment, when added to the existing range of treatment options available in practice, help patients?

Essock, S. M., Drake, R. E., Frank, R. G., & McGuire, T. G. (2003). Randomized controlled trials in evidence-based mental health care: getting the right answer to the right question. Schizophrenia Bulletin29(1), 115-123.

Do students benefit from longer school days? Regression discontinuity evidence from Florida’s additional hour of literacy instruction

This research examines the impact of longer school days on student achievement. This study attempts to fill in gaps in the evidence-base on this topic. Although this study finds positive outcomes for additional reading instruction, it is important to note that for achieving maximum results it is important to pair evidence-based reading instruction practices with the additional instruction time in order to achieve maximum results.

 

Figlio, D., Holden, K. L., & Ozek, U. (2018). Do students benefit from longer school days? Regression discontinuity evidence from Florida’s additional hour of literacy instruction. Economics of Education Review67, 171-183.

Beliefs about learning and enacted instructional practices: An investigation in postsecondary chemistry education

Using the teacher‐centered systemic reform model as a framework, the authors explore the connection between chemistry instructors’ beliefs about teaching and learning and self‐efficacy beliefs, and their enacted classroom practices. 

Gibbons, R. E., Villafañe, S. M., Stains, M., Murphy, K. L., & Raker, J. R. (2018). Beliefs about learning and enacted instructional practices: An investigation in postsecondary chemistry education. Journal of Research in Science Teaching55(8), 1111-1133.

When Evidence-based Literacy Programs Fail.

This study examines the implementation of Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) for struggling readers that had been proven to work in early grades. The findings highlight the importance of considering context and implementation, in addition to evidence of effectiveness, when choosing an intervention program. Not only do schools need to adopt programs supported by evidence, but equally educators need to implement them consistently and effectively if students are to truly benefit from an intervention.

Gonzalez, N. (2018). When evidence-based literacy programs fail. Phi Delta Kappan, 100(4), 54–58. https://doi.org/10.1177/0031721718815675

Users' guide to the medical literature: a manual for evidence-based clinical practice.

The manual offers not just a summary of the articles in JAMA, but modified and expanded material. The manual clearly explain the principles of EBM and guidelines for accessing and evaluating scientific articles.

Guyatt, G., Rennie, D., Meade, M., & Cook, D. (Eds.). (2002). Users' guides to the medical literature: a manual for evidence-based clinical practice (Vol. 706). Chicago: AMA press.

Will the “principles of effectiveness” improve prevention practice? Early findings from a diffusion study

This study examines adoption and implementation of the US Department of Education's new policy, the `Principles of Effectiveness', from a diffusion of innovations theoretical framework. In this report, we evaluate adoption in relation to Principle 3: the requirement to select research-based programs.

Hallfors, D., & Godette, D. (2002). Will the “principles of effectiveness” improve prevention practice? Early findings from a diffusion study. Health Education Research, 17(4), 461–470.

Visible learning: A synthesis of 800+ meta-analyses on achievement.

This unique and ground-breaking book is the result of 15 years’ research and synthesises over 800 meta-analyses relating to the influences on achievement in school-aged students. It builds a story about the power of teachers and of feedback, and constructs a model of learning and understanding.

Hattie, J. (2008). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. routledge.

The Problem with "Proficiency": Limitaions of Statistic and Policy Under No Child Left Behind

The Percentage of Proficient Students (PPS) has become a ubiquitous statistic under the No Child Left Behind Act. The author demonstrates that the PPS metric offers only limited and unrepresentative depictions of large-scale test score trends, gaps, and gap trends.  The author shows how the statistical shortcomings of these depictions extend to shortcomings of policy, from exclusively encouraging score gains near the proficiency cut score to shortsighted comparisons of state and national testing results. The author proposes alternatives for large-scale score reporting and argues that a distribution-wide perspective on results is required for any serious analysis of test score data, including “growth”-related results under the recent Growth Model Pilot Program.

Ho, A. D. (2008). The problem with “proficiency”: Limitations of statistics and policy under No Child Left Behind. Educational researcher37(6), 351-360.

The Use of Single-Subject Research to Identify Evidence-Based Practice in Special Education

This article allows readers to determine if a specific study is a credible example of single-subject research and if a specific practice or procedure has been validated as “evidence-based” via single-subject research.

Horner, R. H., Carr, E. G., Halle, J., McGee, G., Odom, S., & Wolery, M. (2005). The use of single-subject research to identify evidence-based practice in special education. Exceptional children71(2), 165-179.

Accountability policies and teacher decision making: Barriers to the use of data to improve practice

This study examines longitudinal from nine high schools nominated as leading practitioners of Continuous Improvement (CI) practices. The researchers compared continuous improvement best practices to teachers actual use of data in making decisions. The study found teachers to be receptive, but also found that significant obstacles were interfering with the effective use of data that resulted in changes in instruction.

Ingram, D., Louis, K. S., & Schroeder, R. G. (2004). Accountability policies and teacher decision making: Barriers to the use of data to improve practice. Teachers College Record106(6), 1258-1287.

Psychotherapy for Children and Adolescents: Directions for Research and Practice

By focusing on clinical practice and what can be changed, this book offers suggestions for improvement of patient care and advises how clinical work can contribute directly and in new ways to the accumulation of knowledge. 

Kazdin, A. E. (2000). Psychotherapy for children and adolescents: Directions for research and practice. Oxford University Press.

Evidence-Based treatments: Challenges and Priorities for Practice and Research

This article discusses key issues in identifying evidence-based treatments for children and adolescents. Among the issues discussed are obstacles in transporting treatments from research to clinical services, the weak criteria for delineating whether a treatment is evidence based, and barriers to training therapists.

Kazdin, A. E. (2004). Evidence-based treatments: Challenges and priorities for practice and research. Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics13(4), 923-940.

Using coaching to improve the fidelity of evidence-based practices: A review of studies

The authors conducted a comprehensive review of research to identify the impact of coaching on changes in preservice and in-service teachers’ implementation of evidence-based practices. They identified a total of 13 studies from the 20 years of literature they searched. In general, coaching improved the extent to which teachers accurately implement evidence-based practices such as ClassWide Peer Tutoring, Direct Instruction, Learning Strategies, and Positive Behavior Support in classrooms or practicum settings. The retrieved studies also suggest that highly engaged, small-group initial training, followed by multiple observations, feedback, and modeling are critical components across coaching interventions. A few studies also provide promising data to support the consequential effects of coaching on improvements in student achievement. The authors offer suggestions for future research and practice related to preservice and in-service teacher training.

Kretlow, A. G., & Bartholomew, C. C. (2010). Using coaching to improve the fidelity of evidence-based practices: A review of studies. Teacher Education and Special Education, 33, 279-299.

Moneyball for Higher Education: How Federal Leaders Can Use Data and Evidence to Improve Student Outcomes

This report recommend thirteen specific steps the federal government can take to develop new methods to define and measure such outcomes, use federal resources to build and apply evidence of what works, and help colleges and universities invest in student outcomes.

Kvaal, J., Bridgeland, J. (2018). Moneyball for Higher Education: How Federal Leaders Can Use Data and Evidence to Improve Student Outcomes. Retrieved from https://results4america.org/tools/moneyball-higher-education-federal-leaders-can-use-data-evidence-improve-student-outcomes/

Scientific Formative Evaluation: The Role of Individual Learners in Generating and Predicting Successful Educational Outcomes

what does it mean to take a scientific approach to instructional productivity? This chapter hopes to contribute to that discussion by examining the role scientific assessment can play in enhancing educational productivity.

Layng, T. J., Stikeleather, G., & Twyman, J. S. (2006). Scientific formative evaluation: The role of individual learners in generating and predicting successful educational outcomes. The scientific basis of educational productivity, 29-44.

Dear Colleagues Letter: Resource Comparability

Dear Colleagues Letter: Resource Comparability is a letter written by United States Department of Education. This letter was meant to call people attention to disparities that persist in access to educational resources, and to help address those disparities and comply with the legal obligation to provide students with equal access to these resources without regard to race, color, or national origin (This letter addresses legal obligations under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title VI). This letter builds on the prior work shared by the U.S. Department of Education on this critical topic.

Lhamon, C. E. (2014). Dear colleague letter: Resource comparability. Washington, DC: US Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights. Retrieved from http://www2. ed. gov/about/offices/list/ocr/letters/colleague-resourcecomp-201410. pdf.

Practical meta-analysis

The authors lay out each step of meta-analysis from problem formulation through statistical analysis and the interpretation of results.

Lipsey, M. W., & Wilson, D. B. (2001). Practical meta-analysis. Sage Publications, Inc.

No, The Sky is Not Falling: Interpreting the Latest SAT Scores

The College board was recently released SAT scores for the high school graduating class of 2015. Both math and reading scores declined from 2014, continuing a steady downward trend that has been in place for the past decade. Pundits of contrasting political stripes seized on the scores to bolster their political agendas. Petrilli argued that falling SAT scores show that high schools needs more reform. For Burris, the declining scores were evidence of the failure of policies her organization opposes. This articles pointing out that SAT was never meant to measure national achievement and provide detail explanation. 

Loveless, T. (2015). No, the sky is not falling: Interpreting the latest SAT scores. Brown Center Chalkboard. Retrieved from https://www.brookings.edu/blog/brown-center-chalkboard/2015/10/01/no-the-sky-is-not-falling-interpreting-the-latest-sat-scores/

Classroom management that works: Research-based strategies for every teacher

How does classroom management affect student achievement? What techniques do 
teachers find most effective? How important are schoolwide policies and practices in setting 
the tone for individual classroom management? In this follow-up to What Works in Schools, 
Robert J. Marzano analyzes research from more than 100 studies on classroom 
management to discover the answers to these questions and more. He then applies these 
findings to a series of" Action Steps"--specific strategies.

Marzano, R. J., Marzano, J. S., & Pickering, D. (2003). Classroom management that works: Research-based strategies for every teacher. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD).

 

Teacher Preparation Programs: Research and Promising Practices

This paper reports evidence-based research and offers suggestions based on studies that include theoretical work, qualitative analysis, statistical analysis, and randomized experience that could provide strong causal evidence of the effects of teacher preparation on student learning.

Meadows, L., Theodore, K. (2012). Teacher Preparation Programs: Research and Promising Practices. Retrieved from http://www.sedl.org/txcc/resources/briefs/number_11/

Evidence-based Pharmacologic Treatment for People with Severe Mental Illness: a focus on guidelines and algorithms.

In this article we discuss guidelines and algorithms as a means of addressing the complexity of pharmacologic treatment of people with severe mental illnesses and disseminating relevant research findings.

Mellman, T. A., Miller, A. L., Weissman, E. M., Crismon, M. L., Essock, S. M., & Marder, S. R. (2001). Evidence-based pharmacologic treatment for people with severe mental illness: a focus on guidelines and algorithms. Psychiatric Services52(5), 619-625.

Early intervention in reading: From research to practice

This study documents the implementation of research-based strategies to minimize the occurrence of reading difficulties in a first-grade population. Three strategies were implemented: (a) A system of progress monitoring was used to assess student progress and skill acquisition; (b) instruction was characterized by high intensity through the use of groups with a low student-teacher ratio; and (c) an explicit instructional approach was used for children who lacked phonemic awareness or an understanding of the alphabetic principle. Furthermore, teachers were supported in working collaboratively with one another and were provided with ongoing support from a literacy coach. Ninety percent of participants met or exceeded grade-level expectations by the end of the year, and 75% of treatment resisters were eligible for special education. Challenges related to implementation are discussed. 

Menzies, H. M, Mahdavi, J. N., & Lewis, J. L. (2008). Early intervention in reading: From research to practice. Remedial and Special Education, 29(2), 67-77.

Equality and Quality in U.S. Education: Systemic Problems, Systemic Solutions. Policy Brief

This paper enters debate about how U.S. schools might address long-standing disparities in educational and economic opportunities while improving the educational outcomes for all students. with a vision and an argument for realizing that vision, based on lessons learned from 60 years of education research and reform efforts. The central points covered draw on a much more extensive treatment of these issues published in 2015. The aim is to spark fruitful discussion among educators, policymakers, and researchers.

O'Day, J. A., & Smith, M. S. (2016). Equality and Quality in US Education: Systemic Problems, Systemic Solutions. Policy Brief. Education Policy Center at American Institutes for Research.

Report Urges Educators to Avoid Using International Test to Make Policy

This articles suggest policymakers to focus less on the international test and more on how states compare to each other when trying to improve schools. This article also shows how it's not worthwhile to compare school in countries where the conditions are different. 

Rabinovitz, j. (2015, October). Report urges educators to avoid using international tests to make policy. Standford Graduate School of Education. Retrieved from https://ed.stanford.edu/news/national-test-superior-international-ones-assessing-us-schools-says-report

Race Gap in SAT scores highlight inequality and Hinder Upward Mobility

In this paper, we analyze racial differences in the math section of the general SAT test, using publicly available College Board population data for all of the nearly 1.7 million college-bound seniors in 2015 who took the SAT. The evidence for a stubborn race gap on this test does meanwhile provide a snapshot into the extraordinary magnitude of racial inequality in contemporary American society. Standardized tests are often seen as mechanisms for meritocracy, ensuring fairness in terms of access. But test scores reflect accumulated advantages and disadvantages in each day of life up the one on which the test is taken. Race gaps on the SAT hold up a mirror to racial inequities in society as a whole. Equalizing educational opportunities and human capital acquisition earlier is the only way to ensure fairer outcomes.

Reeves, R. V., Halikias, D. (2017). Race Gap in SAT scores highlight inequality and Hinder Upward Mobility. Brookings. Retrieved from https://www.brookings.edu/research/race-gaps-in-sat-scores-highlight-inequality-and-hinder-upward-mobility/

How are they now? Longer term effects of eCoaching through online bug-in-ear technology.

In this study, using mixed methods, we investigated the longer term effects of eCoaching through advanced online bug-in-ear (BIE) technology.

Rock, M. L., Schumacker, R. E., Gregg, M., Howard, P. W., Gable, R. A., & Zigmond, N. (2014). How are they now? Longer term effects of e coaching through online bug-in-ear technology. Teacher Education and Special Education37(2), 161-181.

Preventing Dropout in Secondary Schools

This What Works Clearinghouse practice guide provides educators and administrators with four evidence-based recommendations for reducing dropout rates in middle and high schools. The guide offers specific, strategies; examples of how to implement the practices; advice on how to overcome obstacles; and a summary of the supporting evidence.

 

Rumberger, R. W., et al. (2017). Educator’s Practice Guide: Preventing Dropout in Secondary School. IES National Center for Education and Evaluation and Regional Assistance.

School Intervention That Work: Targeted Support for Low-Performing Students

This report breaks out key steps in the school identification and improvement process, focusing on (1) a diagnosis of school needs; (2) a plan to improve schools; and (3) evidenced-based interventions that work.

 

School Intervention That Work: Targeted Support for Low-Performing Students. (2017). Alliance For Excellent Education. Retrieved from https://all4ed.org/reports-factsheets/schoolinterventions/

Training in Evidence-Based Interventions (EBIs): What are school psychology programs teaching?

This study examined the degree to which school psychology programs provided training in Evidence-Based Interventions (EBIs), examined the contextual factors that interfere with EBI training, and whether students are taught to apply the criteria developed by Divisions 12, 16, and 53 of the APA when evaluating outcome research. 

Shernoff, E. S., Kratochwill, T. R., & Stoiber, K. C. (2003). Training in Evidence-Based Interventions (EBIs): What are school psychology programs teaching?. Journal of School Psychology41(6), 467-483.

Curriculum-based Measurement: Assessing Special Children

Curriculum-Based Measurement and Special Services for Children is a concise and convenient guide to CBM that demonstrates why it is a valuable assessment procedure, and how it can be effectively utilized by school professionals.

Shinn, M. R. (Ed.). (1989). Curriculum-based measurement: Assessing special children. Guilford Press.

Advanced Applications of Curriculum-based Measurement

Developed specifically to overcome problems with traditional standardized instruments--and widely used in both general and special education settings throughout the US--curriculum-based measurement (CBM) comprises brief assessment probes of reading, spelling, written expression, and mathematics that serve both to quantify student performance and to bolster academic achievement.

Shinn, M. R. (Ed.). (1998). Advanced applications of curriculum-based measurement. Guilford Press.

Stanfrod Education Data Archive

The Stanford Education Data Archive (SEDA) is an initiative aimed at harnessing data to help scholars, policymakers, educators, and parents learn how to improve educational opportunity for all children. The data are publicly available here, so that anyone can obtain detailed information about American schools, communities, and student success.

Stanfrod Education Data Archive. Standford Center for Education Policy Analysis. Retrieved from https://cepa.stanford.edu/seda/overview

What's the E for EBM?

Familiarity with Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) terminology has extended into the popular press, as evidenced by a recent article in the Times describing the number needed to treat. But all this leads to the question, “What's the E for EBM?”

Straus, S. E. (2004). What's the E for EBM?.

Making the case for evidence- based policy

U.S. public policy has increasingly been conceived, debated, and evaluated through the lenses of politics and ideology. The fundamental question -- Will the policy work? -- too often gets short shrift or even ignored. A remedy is evidence-based policy--a rigourous approach that draws on careful data collection, experimentation, and both quantitative and qualitative analysis to determine what the problem is, which ways it can be addressed, and the probable impacts of each of these ways. Examples of how evidence informs good policy and lack of evidence can invite bad include health insurance coverage, education, sentencing policy, and redress for housing discrimination.

Wesley, P. W., & Buysse, V. (2006). Making the case for evidence- based policy. In V. Buysse & P. W. Wesley (Eds.), Evidence-based practice in the early childhood field (pp. 117–159). Washington, DC: Zero to Three.

Troubleshooting Behavioral Interventions: A Systematic Process for Finding and Eliminating Problems

This article describes a systematic process for finding and resolving problems with classroom-based behavioral interventions in schools. 

Witt, J. C., VanDerHeyden, A. M., & Gilbertson, D. (2004). Troubleshooting behavioral interventions: A systematic process for finding and eliminating problems. School Psychology Review33, 363-383.

TITLE
SYNOPSIS
American Education Research Association (AERA)
This national organization works to advance the public good through advocacy and the promotion of rigorous research in education.
American Enterprise Institute
AEI is a private, nonpartisan, not-for-profit institution dedicated to research and education on issues of government, politics, economics and social welfare.
American Institutes for Research (AIR)
AIR is one of the world's largest behavioral and social science research and evaluation organizations. Its research focus includes most aspects of K-12 education.
Annenberg Institute for School Reform
The Annenberg Institute for School Reform is a national policy-research and reform support organization that promotes quality education for all children, especially in urban communities.
Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI)
ABAI organization promotes the development, and support of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.
Australian Society for Evidence Based Teaching

This web site provides evidence-based resources for free to teachers, principals, and parents.

Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies
The mission of the organization is to advance the scientific study of behavior and its humane application to the solution of practical problems in the home, school, community, and the workplace
Campbell Collaboration (C2)

The organization promotes well-informed decision making by preparing, maintaining and disseminating systematic reviews in education, crime and justice, social welfare and international development.

Center for Research and Reform in Education (CRRE)
CRRE is a research center who’s major goal is to improve the quality of education through high-quality research and evaluation studies and the dissemination of evidence-based research.
Cochrane Collaboration
Cochrane is an independent network of health practitioners, researchers, patient advocates and others, responding to the challenge of making the vast amounts of evidence generated through research useful for informing decisions about health.
Current Controlled Trials - Medicine
This is an example from medicine of dissemination of evidence-based practices.
Daniel Willingham - Web Site
Daniel Willingham is a resource to help those interested in issues of education to find practical, helpful information on what works and what doesn’t. His videos are of special interest.
Data Quality Campaign
This nonprofit organization promotes the systematic and outcome driven use of data at all levels of education
Education Policy Center
This site is the education division of the American Institute of Research.
Education Week
This organization is a source of news, information, and analysis on American education
Education Writers Association (EWA)
EWA is a professional organization of members of the media who cover education at all levels.
EducationNews.org
EducationNews provides the latest daily coverage from U. S. and world media publications, commentaries and reports are featured and include comprehensive views on education issues from all sides of the political spectrum.
ERIC -

ERIC is an online library of education research and information, sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Hechinger Report | Common Core
The Hechinger Report is an independent, nonprofit newsroom that covers inequality and innovation in education with in-depth journalism.
Institute of Education Sciences
IES is the statistics, research, and evaluation arm of the U.S. Department of Education. Its mission is to provide scientific evidence on which to ground education practice and policy and to share this information in formats that are useful and accessible to educators, parents, policymakers, researchers, and the public.
Journal of Contemporary Clinical Trials
Contemporary Clinical Trials is an international journal that publishes manuscripts pertaining to the design, methods and operational aspects of clinical trials.
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