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How important is assessment during Covid-19?

May 5, 2021

NEPC Review: “Student Assessment During COVID-19. School closings and the ever-increasing number of deaths provide the backdrop for a proposal by the Center for American Progress (CAP) to deny waivers of the federally mandated administration of standardized tests in spring 2021. Further, the federal government proposes to add to those assessments in ways that CAP argues would make the test results more useful. In its recent report, CAP sides with the Department of Education’s policy of denying such requests for waivers, and it calls for additional assessments that “capture multiple as- pects of student well-being, including social-emotional needs, engagement, and conditions for learning” as well as supplementary gathering of student information. The report contends this will ensure greater equity in the time of the pandemic, supposedly through the addition of the new measures to annual assessments. 

Citation: Glass, G.V., Mathis, W.J., & Berliner, D.C. (2020). NEPC Review: “Student Assessment During COVID-19.” Boulder, CO: National Education Policy Center. Retrieved May 5, 2021 from http://nepc.colorado.edu/thinktank/pandemic-assessment

Link: https://nepc.colorado.edu/sites/default/files/reviews/NR%20Berliner-Glass-Mathis_0.pdf

 


 

What are the costs of providing effective coaching?

April 14, 2021

Cost-Effectiveness of Instructional Coaching: Implementing a Design-Based, Continuous Improvement Model to Advance Teacher Professional Development. Schools devote substantial resources to teacher professional development each year. Yet studies show much of this investment is directed toward ineffective short-term workshops that have little impact on instructional change or student outcomes. At the same time, more intensive job-embedded forms of professional learning, such as instructional coaching, require substantially more resources than traditional professional development. The authors report the results of a two-year study assessing the cost-effectiveness of instructional coaching through a design-based, continuous improvement research model. Our findings suggest that coaching programs can become more cost-effective over time, as coaches and teachers refine their work together. 

Citation: Knight, D. S., & Skrtic, T. M. (2020). Cost-Effectiveness of Instructional Coaching: Implementing a Design-Based, Continuous Improvement Model to Advance Teacher Professional Development. Journal of School Leadership, 1052684620972048.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1052684620972048

 


 

What does the research inform educators about professional development?

April 13, 2021

The Effects Of High-Quality Professional Development On Teachers And Students. This study includes an analysis of 52 randomized controlled trials evaluating teacher development programs, in order to establish their impact on pupil and teacher outcomes. The results suggest continued professional development has a significant effect on student learning.

Citation: Fletcher-Wood, H. and Zuccollo, J. (2020). The Effects Of High-Quality Professional Development On Teachers And Students: A Rapid Review and Meta-analysis. London, UK: Education Policy Institute. https://epi.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/EPI-Wellcome_CPD-Review__2020.pdf

Link: https://epi.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/EPI-Wellcome_CPD-Review__2020.pdf

 


 

Is professional development training retained?

April 12, 2021

Does Teacher Learning Last? Understanding How Much Teachers Retain Their Knowledge After Professional Development. Teacher professional development (PD) is seen as a promising intervention to improve teacher knowledge, instructional practice, and ultimately student learning. While research finds instances of significant program effects on teacher knowledge, little is known about how long these effects last. If teachers forget what is learned, the contribution of the intervention will be diminished. Using a large-scale data set, this study examines the sustainability of gains in teachers’ content knowledge for teaching mathematics (CKT-M). Results show that there is a negative rate of change in CKT after teachers complete the training, suggesting that the average score gain from the program is lost in just 37 days.

Citation: Liu, S., & Phelps, G. (2020). Does Teacher Learning Last? Understanding How Much Teachers Retain Their Knowledge After Professional Development. Journal of Teacher Education71(5), 537-550.

Link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Geoffrey-Phelps/publication/337356641_Does_Teacher_Learning_Last_Understanding_How_Much_Teachers_Retain_Their_Knowledge_After_Professional_Development/links/5ed1530c92851c9c5e6640b0/Does-Teacher-Learning-Last-Understanding-How-Much-Teachers-Retain-Their-Knowledge-After-Professional-Development.pdf

 


 

What are challenges schools face in providing professional development in rural school systems?

April 12, 2021

Teacher Professional Development Challenges Faced by Rural Superintendents. Effective teacher professional development is defined as structured professional learning activities which result in changes in teacher practice and improvements in student learning outcomes. Superintendents face common challenges unique to the rural environment which hinder the delivery of effective teacher professional development in rural school districts. These barriers must be addressed to ensure a high-quality education for all rural students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the common experiences and perceptions of superintendents responsible for providing teacher professional development in rural school districts.

Citation: Cadero-Smith, L. A. (2020). Teacher Professional Development Challenges Faced by Rural Superintendents. Monument, CO: International Society for Technology, Education and Science (ISTES). https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED605531.pdf.

Link: https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED605531.pdf

 


 

How can professional development improve teachers use of classroom management practices?

April 12, 2021

The effects of targeted professional development on teachers’ use of empirically supported classroom management practices. Research suggests teachers receive limited training and support in classroom management, making it essential that school leaders provide efficient and effective professional development opportunities. This paper looks at the effects of a targeted professional development (TPD) approach (brief training, email prompts, and self-management of trained skills) on teachers’ use of three empirically supported classroom management skills (prompts, opportunities to respond [OTR], and specific praise). The results find that teachers increased their prompt and specific praise rates while they actively engaged in TPD. However, training effects did not maintain when TPD shifted to a new skill, and teachers’ increased use of OTRs during TPD was neither statistically significant nor sustained. Teachers found TPD to be acceptable, usable, and feasible.

Citation: Simonsen, B., Freeman, J., Myers, D., Dooley, K., Maddock, E., Kern, L., & Byun, S. (2020). The effects of targeted professional development on teachers’ use of empirically supported classroom management practices. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions22(1), 3-14.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1098300719859615

 


 

How can schools improve student teacher mentors performance?

April 12, 2021

Making the Most of Student Teaching: The Importance of Mentors and Scope for Change. A growing literature documents the importance of student teaching placements for teacher development. Emerging evidence from this literature highlights the importance of the mentor teacher who supervises this placement, as teachers tend to be more effective when they student teach with a mentor who is a more effective teacher. But the efficacy of policies that aim to have effective teachers perform as mentors depend a great deal on the availability of effective teachers to serve in this role. This paper examines data from Washington State to identify ways for improving student-teacher placements. The authors propose if policymakers value teacher candidate development equivalently to teacher in-service development, they should be willing to pay substantially more than the current average compensation for mentor teachers to recruit effective teachers to serve in this role.

Citation: Goldhaber, D., Krieg, J., Naito, N., & Theobald, R. (2020). Making the most of student teaching: The importance of mentors and scope for change. Education Finance and Policy15(3), 581-591.

Link: https://direct.mit.edu/edfp/article/15/3/581/58672/Making-the-Most-of-Student-Teaching-The-Importance

 


 

What is the impact of student teachers on student’s performance?

April 12, 2021

Exploring the impact of student teaching apprenticeships on student achievement and mentor teachers.The authors examine the impact of preservice teachers on student achievement during the apprenticeship training and in the future. While the average causal effect of hosting a student-teacher on student performance in the internship year is indistinguishable from zero in both math and reading, hosting a student-teacher has modest positive impacts on student math reading achievement in a teacher’s classroom in the following years. These findings suggest that schools can participate in the student teaching process without fear of short-term decreases in student test scores while potentially gaining modest, long-term increases in test scores.

Citation: Goldhaber, D., Krieg, J. M., & Theobald, R. (2020). Exploring the impact of student teaching apprenticeships on student achievement and mentor teachers. Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness13(2), 213-234.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/19345747.2019.1698087

 


 

What can a research synthesis of meta-analyses tell us about teacher preservice training?

April 9, 2021

Research Synthesis of Meta-Analyses of Preservice Teacher Preparation Practices in Higher Education. This research looks at the results from a meta-analysis of 14 different preservice experiences for beginning teacher preparation. The study finds that clinically rich field experiences and instruction that include practicing new skills involve coaching, clinical supervision, performance feedback, and collaborative learning opportunities stood out as critical practices that improve beginning teacher outcomes.

Citation: Dunst, C. J., Hamby, D. W., Howse, R. B., Wilkie, H., & Annas, K. (2020). Research Synthesis of Meta-Analyses of Preservice Teacher Preparation Practices in Higher Education. Higher Education Studies10(1), 29-47.

Link: https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1236015.pdf

 


 

What do we know about effective teacher preparation?

April 9, 2021

Linking Teacher Preparation Program Design and Implementation to Outcomes for Teachers and Students. This book examines how to improve teacher preparation programs using the best available evidence. The chapters explore how data availability, quality, and use within and across preparation programs shed light on the structures, policies, and practices associated with high-quality teacher preparation. The authors look at critical questions about the connection between what takes place during teacher preparation and subsequent outcomes for teachers and students. Despite a long history of teacher preparation and considerable investments in preservice and in-service training, there remains much to be learned about effectively training teachers. The chapter topics include;

• Improving Teacher Preparation: The Promise, Challenges, and Research Needs of State Accountability Systems,
• Learning to Teach: Optimizing Coursework and Fieldwork Requirements in Traditional Teacher Preparation,
• Using Case Study Data of Completers as Evidence in a Continuous Improvement Model,
• Educating Effective Science Teachers: Preparing and Following Teachers Into the Field,
• Measuring Diversity in Teacher Candidate Practicum Placements and its Relationship to Outcomes,
• Signature Practices in an Urban Residency Program: How Are These Practices Evident in the Graduates’ Classrooms,
• Preparing and Keeping Our Best: Linking a Measure of Preservice Teacher Quality to Professional Outcomes,
• Toward Causal Evidence on Effective Teacher Preparation, and
• Supporting the Use of Evidence in Teacher Preparation: Considerations and Next Steps.

Citation: Carinci, J. E., Jackson, C., & Meyer, S. J. (Eds.). (2020). Linking Teacher Preparation Program Design and Implementation to Outcomes for Teachers and Students. IAP.

Link: Linking Teacher Preparation Program Design and Implementation to Outcomes