COVID-19 Impact

As the States get closer to re-opening K-12 schools, there is still much we don’t know about the Covid-19 virus and its impact on children.  We don’t know the number of children who have the virus, their range of symptoms, their contagious rates, and how best to protect their safety and that of those around them.  Prevention strategies used by adults—hand washing, social distancing—become much more challenging when trying to implement them with children of all ages, in closed environments, and high student teacher ratios.  The stakes couldn’t be higher.  Tens of millions of children and adults will be part of this intervention.  Even the slightest outbreaks can close schools back down indefinitely.  Given this level of uncertainty and potential contingencies, it is critical to track data that will help schools identify problems quickly, assess their nature, and respond in timely and effective ways to safeguard the health of students and education staff while providing a quality education. 

This overview provides relevant, up-to-date research and data on critical aspects of operating K-12 schools in the Covid-19 era.  Specifically it will track the following critical issues: (1) student health (recent research, data on exposure, infections, intensive care use, and deaths), (2) Staff health (recent research, data on exposure, infections, intensive ward, deaths, (3) school health (recent research, models, school openings, school closings), and (4) student performance (student absenteeism, academic performance, social behavioral issues)

SCHOOLS:  Covid-19 Data and K-12 Education

American Academy of Pediatrics. (2020). Children and COVID-19: State-Level Data Report. 2020. Available in: https://downloads.aap.org/AAP/PDF/AAP%20and%20CHA%20-%20Children%20and%20COVID-19%20State%20Data%20Report%2011.12.20%20FINAL.pdf.

In the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic, States are struggling to reopen and keep open, most, if not all, of their 138,000 K-12 schools.  This will have an impact on 55 million students, 6 million teachers and education staff, and all of the families of those involved.  It is being done despite significant uncertainty as to the impact Covid-19 will have on the health of students and education staff.  And ultimately, there is the question of how effective education will be in the context of different schedules, models, distractions, potential school closures, and remote learning. 

Given this level of uncertainty, it is critical to track data that will help schools identify problems quickly, assess their nature, and respond in timely and effective ways to safeguard the health of students and education staff while providing a quality education. This Wing Institute dashboard will on track issues regarding the reopening of schools under the Covid-19 pandemic.  It will provide relevant, up-to-date research and data on in the following areas:

  1. Student health (recent research, data on exposure, infections, intensive care use, and deaths)
  2. Staff health (recent research, data on exposure, infections, intensive ward, deaths
  3. School health (recent research, models, school openings, school closings)
  4. Student performance (student absenteeism, academic performance, social behavioral issues)

Table of Contents

  • Student Health: Total Number of Child Covid-19 Cases
  • Student Health: Growth Rate in Covid-19 Total Cases Over Recent Weeks
  • Student Health: Number and Growth Rate of Covid-19 Cases per 100,000 Children
  • Student Health: Total Number of Children Hospitalized for Covid-19
  • Student Health: Percent of Children Requiring Hospitalization
  • Student Health: Total Number of Child Covid-19 Deaths
  • Student Health: Percent of Child Covid-19 Cases Resulting in Death

 

Figure 1.  Student Health: Total Number of Child Covid-19 Cases

As of November 12, 2020, there are over one million children who have been identified as having, or having had, the Covid-19 virus. 

 

Figure 2.  Student Health:  Growth Rate in Covid-19 Total Cases Over Recent Weeks

 

The percent growth in the number of children with Covid-19  had accelerated every week since April 16, 2020, rising from a 2.2% weekly increase to a 11.9% weekly growth.

 

Figure 3.  Student Health:  Number of Covid-19 Cases per 100,000 Children

 

The number of Covid-19 cases per children is an even more important number because it is a metric of infection that is irrespective of the number of children tested.  This data shows a growth rate of 20% over the last two weeks alone, and a doubling over the past ten weeks

 

Figure 4.  Student Health:  Total Number of Children Hospitalized for Covid-19

 

The total number of children who have been hospitalized due to Covid-19 continues to increase.

Figure 5.   Student Health:  Percent of Children Requiring Hospitalization

  

But the percent of children who require hospitalization due to Covid-19 remains very low and steady.

 

Figure 6.   Student Health:  Total Number of Child Covid-19 Deaths

  

The number of children who have died from the Covid-19 virus has been very small.

 

Figure 7.  Student Health:  Percent of Child Covid-19 Cases Resulting in Death

 

The percent of children who have died is extremely small, and has actually dropped steadily over the past four months.

 

For access to past report on Covid-19

Publications

TITLE
SYNOPSIS
CITATION
Creating a Dashboard to Monitor the Reopening of Schools: The Baseline

In the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic, States will soon reopen most, if not all, of their 138,000 K-12  schools and 55 million students will return to the classroom. As most of the research is still in its early stage, and there is no data yet on the reopening schools, this  analysis starts with a baseline of the information we have to date for I. student health and II. staff health. 



Keyworth, R., & States, J. (2020). Creating a Dashboard to Monitor the Reopening of Schools: The Baseline. Oakland, CA:  The Wing Institute. https://www.winginstitute.org/covid-19-impact. 



TITLE
SYNOPSIS
CITATION
Remote Learning Overview

The Covid-19 pandemic has resulted in school closings for the remainder of the year in 48 of 50 states and a sharp turn toward remote instruction in order to finish the year as best as possible. Understanding best practice in remote instruction and learning will be key as schools look to the future.

Donley, J., Detrich, R., States, J., & Keyworth, (2020). Remote Learning Overview. Oakland, CA: The Wing Institute. https://www.winginstitute.org/effective-instruction-computers.

How technology, coronavirus will change teaching by 2025

In early March, Education Week caught up with them by phone when they were in Paris to speak at an ed-tech conference. We asked them how their 2015 predictions had fared. Then, we talked again in late April, when the coronavirus had suddenly transformed K-12 education into a massive remote learning system.

Gewertz, C. (2020, June 2). How technology, coronavirus will change teaching by 2025. Education Week. https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2020/06/03/how-technology-coronavirus-will-change-teaching-by.html

 
Amid Pandemic, Support Soars for Online Learning, Parent Poll Shows:

The survey was conducted in May 2020. While this was early in the Covid-19 pandemic, unemployment was already 14.7%, the economy in recession, and the schools were shutdown.  This survey provides one of the first opportunities to evaluate the public’s views on education in this context

Henderson, M. B., Houston, D. M., Peterson, P. E.,  West, M. R. & Shakeel, M. D. (2020). Amid Pandemic, Support Soars for Online Learning, Parent Poll Shows Results from the 2020 Education Next Survey of Public Opinion.  Education Next20(13), 8-19. https://www.educationnext.org/amid-pandemic-support-soars-online-learning-parent-poll-shows-2020-education-next-survey-public-opinion/

Amid Pandemic, Support Soars for Online Learning, Parent Poll Shows:

 The survey was conducted in May 2020.  While this was early in the Covid-19 pandemic, unemployment was already 14.7%, the economy in recession, and the schools were shutdown.  This survey provides one of the first opportunities to evaluate the public’s views on education in this context.

Henderson, M. B., Houston, D. M., Peterson, P. E.,  West, M. R. & Shakeel, M. D. (2020). Amid Pandemic, Support Soars for Online Learning, Parent Poll Shows Results from the 2020 Education Next Survey of Public Opinion.  Education Next20(13), 8-19.

 

The disparities in remote learning under coronavirus (in charts)

The messy transition to remote learning in America’s K-12 education system as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic has been marked by glaring disparities among schools, according to nationally representative surveys of U.S. teachers and school district leaders administered by the EdWeek Research Center.

Herold, B. (2020, April 10). The disparities in remote learning under coronavirus (in charts). Education Week.https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2020/04/10/the-disparities-in-remote-learning-under-coronavirus.html

 
The rise of K–12 blended learning.

Online learning is sweeping across America. In the year 2000, roughly 45,000 K–12 students took an online course. In 2009, more than 3 million K–12 students did. What was originally a distance-learning phenomenon no longer is. Most of the growth is occurring in blended-learning environments, in which students learn online in an adult-supervised environment at least part of the time. As this happens, online learning has the potential to transform America’s education system by serving as the backbone of a system that offers more personalized learning approaches for all students.

Horn, M., & Staker, H. (2011). The rise of K–12 blended learning. Mountain View, CA: Innosight Institute.

 
Virtual schools in the U.S. 2019

This report provides disinterested scholarly analyses of the characteristics and performance of fulltime, publicly funded K-12 virtual schools; reviews the relevant available research related to virtual school practices; provides an overview of recent state legislative efforts to craft virtual schools policy; and offers policy recommendations based on the available evidence.

Molnar, A., Miron, G., Elgeberi, N., Barbour, M. K., Huerta, L., Shafer, S. R., & Rice, J. K. (2019). Virtual schools in the U.S. 2019. Boulder, CO: National Education Policy Center. https://nepc.colorado.edu/sites/default/files/publications/Virtual%20Schools%202019.pdf

 
Learning remotely when schools close: How well are students and schools prepared? Insights from PISA.

That being said, the Covid-19 crisis strikes at a point when most of the education systems covered by the OECD’s latest round of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) are not ready for the world of digital learning opportunities. Below are some sobering numbers.

OECD (2020). Learning remotely when schools close: How well are students and schools prepared? Insights from PISA. https://read.oecd-ilibrary.org/view/?ref=127_127063-iiwm328658&title=Learning-remotely-when-schools-close

10 strategies for online learning during a coronavirus outbreak.

Members of ISTE’s professional learning networks have been hard at work identifying key practices for successful online learning. Here are some of the best ideas from educators from around the world, many of whom have already been teaching during coronavirus closures. 

Snelling, J., & Fingal, D. (2020, March 16). 10 strategies for online learning during a coronavirus outbreak. Washington, DC: International Society for Technology in Education. https://www.iste.org/explore/learning-during-covid-19/10-strategies-online-learning-during-coronavirus-outbreak

 

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