Categories for Monitoring

The Cost of Suspensions in California Schools

March 21, 2017

The Hidden Cost of California’s Harsh School Discipline: And the Localized Economic Benefits from Suspending Fewer High School Students

This research from the Center for Civil Rights Remedies at the Civil Rights Project, UCLA, and California Dropout Research Project shows that the overuse of suspensions in California schools is harming student achievement and graduation rates, and causing billions of dollars in economic damage. The financial consequences of school suspensions, including both additional costs borne by taxpayers as a result of suspensions and lost economic benefit, are quantified. The impact of school suspension varies widely by school district, with California’s largest districts incurring the greatest losses. For example, suspensions in the Los Angeles Unified School District for a 10th grade cohort are estimated to cause $148 million in economic damage. The report calculates a total statewide economic burden of $2.7 billion over the lifetime of the single 10th grade cohort.

Rumberger, R., & Losen, D. (2017). The Hidden Cost of California’s Harsh School Discipline: And the Localized Economic Benefits from Suspending Fewer High School Students. The Center for Civil Rights Remedies at the Civil Rights Project, UCLA, and California Dropout Research Project.

https://www.civilrightsproject.ucla.edu/resources/projects/center-for-civil-rights-remedies/school-to-prison-folder/summary-reports/the-hidden-cost-of-californias-harsh-discipline/CostofSuspensionReportFinal-corrected-030917.pdf

 


 

20% of High School Students Passed an AP Exam in 2016

February 23, 2017

1 in 5 Public School Students in the Class of 2016 Passed an AP Exam

The number of students taking Advanced Placement (AP) tests has grown to more than 2.5 million students annually. Overall test scores have remained relatively constant despite a 60% increase in the number of students taking AP exams since 2006. In school year 2015–16, 20% of students taking an AP test passed and were eligible for college credit. The College Board also reports a continuing trend in the significant increase in the number of low-income students participating in the program. Unfortunately, this trend may be negatively impacted by changes in funding. The federal grant program subsidizing AP tests for low-income students has been replaced by block grants in the Every Student Succeeds Act. These funds may still be applied to subsidize low-income populations but are not mandated for this purpose as in the past.

Zubrzycki, J. (2017). 1 in 5 Public School Students in the Class of 2016 Passed an AP Exam. Education Week.

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2017/02/ap_results_release_2017.html?cmp=eml-enl-eu-news2

College Board Advance Placement Data: https://research.collegeboard.org/programs/ap/data/participation/ap-2016

 


 

Examining Test Based Accountability

December 11, 2014

This opinion piece by Robert Slavin questions the effectiveness of how test-based accountability is currently been employed in the United States. Slavin doesn’t question the use of high stakes testing as a valuable tool for identification of poorly performing students and schools. Read More…

 


 

Voter Perceptions of the Common Core Standards

March 21, 2014

Forty-six states and Washington DC have adopted the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) first conceived of by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers. Thirty-five states plan to fully Read More…

 


 

The SAT is to be redesigned for 2016

March 10, 2014

The College Board announced a major revision of the SAT college admission test. The redesigned SAT will no longer require an essay, place less emphasis on certain vocabulary, as well as return to the 1600-point scoring scale. This is the second major revision of the SAT in its 88-year history. The College Board’s refurbishment of the SAT is intended to provide greater opportunities for students from lower socio-economic backgrounds. The College Board is also taking on the test-preparation industry that sells materials and courses at high costs to help students raise their scores. The College Board will offer free online tutorials to help students train for the SAT.

https://www.collegeboard.org/delivering-opportunity/sat/redesign

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/sat-to-drop-essay-requirement-and-return-to-top-score-of-1600-in-redesign-of-admission-test/2014/03/05/2aa9eee4-a46a-11e3-8466-d34c451760b9_story.html

 


 

Balefire Reviews Educational Apps

December 4, 2013

Balfire has produced a web site to help parents and educators make informed decisions when considering the purchase of educational apps. The site strives to be a non-biased and objective source of evidence based information that offers reviews of educational apps that can be searched by subject (Math, Science, English/language arts) as well as by the target age of the app developers (0-3 through 19 up). This can be a useful tool for both the parent and the educator who are confronted with a confusing array of apps purporting to be effective uses of technology in teaching. The reviews examine each program against meeting criteria for effective instructional design.

Criteria include:

  • Feedback for Correct Answers
  • Error Feedback
  • Adapting Difficulty
  • Error Remediation
  • Mastery-Based Instruction
  • Frequent, Meaningful Learner Interaction
  • Clearly-Stated Learning Objective

http://www.balefirelabs.com/apps/